Grantees
and Partners

Queens Museum

Overview

The Queens Museum is dedicated to presenting the highest quality visual arts and educational programming for people in the New York metropolitan area, and particularly for the residents of Queens, a uniquely diverse, ethnic, cultural, and international community. The Museum fulfills its mission by designing and providing art exhibitions, public programs and educational experiences that promote the appreciation and enjoyment of art, support the creative efforts of artists, and enhance the quality of life through programs that center on personal wellness. The Queens Museum presents artistic and educational programs and exhibitions that directly relate to the contemporary urban life of its constituents, while maintaining the highest standards of professional, intellectual, and ethical responsibility.

Grant

Purpose: To support the Queens Museum’s ArtAccess programs. ArtAccess programs at the Queens Museum serve children and adults with varying physical, emotional, behavioral, and cognitive abilities across the New York City area

The Queens Museum (QM) considers its ArtAccess offerings as inherently tied to its mission. QM’s roster of ongoing ArtAccess programs includes:

  • Creative Imagination program for older adults with Alzheimer’s or memory loss
  • In-school residencies
  • School tours and workshops

Through consultation with program participants and art therapy professionals, QM now offers remote art making and art appreciation programs that promote well-being and healing through art, during these unsettling times that include:

  • Caregiver Art Talks for adult caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer’s or memory loss.
  • Virtual Open studios for diverse artists including young adults with autism, adults with varying abilities, and independent artists with mental illness.
  • La Ventanita/The Little Window, a program for adults and children that uses art and writing to promote personal healing and improved wellbeing.

In addition to serving visitors on site, in school classrooms, and through online video platforms, ArtAccess provides programming for people in special situations, such as those who are homebound, suffering from extended illness, incarcerated, or in foster care. The Museum’s model programs include arts therapy and art education for children and youth in psychiatric hospitals, including New York City Children’s Center Queens Campus (formerly known as Queens Children’s Psychiatric Center) St. Mary’s Children’s Hospital, and Zucker Hillside Hospital’s Adolescent Psychiatric Pavilion. Programs are in partnership with organizations and schools throughout New York City, including Queens Community House, the Hebrew Academy for Special Children, and staff in public schools serving students with special needs.

 


 

Photos by Kuo-Heng Huang.